andrewbreitel:

sagansense:

asapscience:

The Titanboa: the scariest part about it is that it actually existed. 

via A World So Great!

Stay curious. Watch Smithsonian’s documentary 'Titanoboa: Monster Snake' to learn more about this crazy beast.

god bless fucking extinction

(via mildmanneredcutekid)

lifeunderthewaves:

Have You Met Frank? by LisaSkelton Meet Frank. The friendly blue groper we spend our summers snorkelling with off Cabbage Tree Island, Port Stephens NSW. This guy is the star of our company’s snorkelling trips, taking urchins from our hands and enjoying being the centre of attention. No insecurities here! This guy loves the camera! He watches and waits for me to dive before rushing over to roll and dance in front of the lens and occasionally head butt and rub the dome port.

(via trynottodrown)

science-sexual:

breelandwalker:

*HIC-BLORP*

This is a fucking seal with hiccups which makes is like fifteen times funnier because they’re such ridiculous predators.

science-sexual:

breelandwalker:

*HIC-BLORP*

This is a fucking seal with hiccups which makes is like fifteen times funnier because they’re such ridiculous predators.

(via trynottodrown)

trynottodrown:

Remember the ocean makes up 71% of Earth’s surface, Happy Earth day!
trynottodrown:

Remember the ocean makes up 71% of Earth’s surface, Happy Earth day!
trynottodrown:

Remember the ocean makes up 71% of Earth’s surface, Happy Earth day!
trynottodrown:

Remember the ocean makes up 71% of Earth’s surface, Happy Earth day!

trynottodrown:

Remember the ocean makes up 71% of Earth’s surface, Happy Earth day!

awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)
awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour. 
biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.
photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensen, louise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)

awkwardsituationist:

though usually hidden to the human eye, naturally occurring marine biofluorescence can be seen under certain wavelengths of light (like ultraviolet) which causes the cells of the organisms seen here to absorb the light — and some of the photon’s energy — and then emit back a now less energetic light with a longer wavelength and thus a different colour.

biofluorescence is not be confused with bioluminescence (see posts), which is a  chemical reaction endemic to an organisms that causes them to glow.

photos by (click pic) daniel stoupin, alexander semenov, bent christensenlouise murray, and american museum of natural history (click pic for species)

(via trynottodrown)

aspacelobster:

parisoon:

Quick (featherless!) sculpt of the new Oviraptor on the block Anzu wylilei.

I’ll feather this guy another time (/once I think of a way to do the feathers)

required reading if you’re trying to figure out how to do feathers.

pyrobutts:

So apparently this is what happens when I sleep early at 8pm.. and wake up at 1am.. And now it’s going to be 4am.. 
I’ll reblog this again with links to society6. For now I kinda need to sleep again. 
pyrobutts:

So apparently this is what happens when I sleep early at 8pm.. and wake up at 1am.. And now it’s going to be 4am.. 
I’ll reblog this again with links to society6. For now I kinda need to sleep again. 

pyrobutts:

So apparently this is what happens when I sleep early at 8pm.. and wake up at 1am.. And now it’s going to be 4am.. 

I’ll reblog this again with links to society6. For now I kinda need to sleep again. 

(via ieffinglovedinosaurs)

animalgifdaily:

source
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.
strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)
The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.

strangebiology:

The Cuttlefish - The Kings of Camouflage (PBS/Nova)

The cuttlefish can change its color, pattern, shape, and texture on command to blend into their environs, communicate with other cuttlefish, and to threaten potential predators. They can also produce undulating lights to confuse their prey. These cephalopods are considered among the most intelligent invertebrates.

(via fuckyeahkingdomanimalia)