raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 
Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 
raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 
Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 
raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 
Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 
raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 
Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 
raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 
Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 
raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 
Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 

raptorfood:

The work of Davide Bonadonna, the talented artist who did the reconstructions for the National Geographic’s Spinosaurus exhibit that i’m still coming down from. 

Also! be sure to check out this page at NatGeo’s web site: 

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/10/spinosaurus/beast-graphic 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pfeffer’s Flamboyant Cuttlefish
(Metasepia pfefferi)
Is another species of cuttlefish that occupies the same habitat as the pyjama squid, Indo-Pacific and Australia, also it shares it’s poison glands as it is one of the few Cephalopods that are poisonous, displayed by it’s flamboyant colors. they are also quite small as well at 2.4 in. they are active during the day and are known to hunt it uses camouflage to stalk its prey. another feature of this species is due to it’s small cuttlebone it can’t float/swim for long periods of time and almost exclusivly walks upon the sea floor
Phylogeny
Animalia-Mollusca-Cephalopoda-Sepiida-Sepiidae-Metasepia
astronomy-to-zoology:

Pfeffer’s Flamboyant Cuttlefish
(Metasepia pfefferi)
Is another species of cuttlefish that occupies the same habitat as the pyjama squid, Indo-Pacific and Australia, also it shares it’s poison glands as it is one of the few Cephalopods that are poisonous, displayed by it’s flamboyant colors. they are also quite small as well at 2.4 in. they are active during the day and are known to hunt it uses camouflage to stalk its prey. another feature of this species is due to it’s small cuttlebone it can’t float/swim for long periods of time and almost exclusivly walks upon the sea floor
Phylogeny
Animalia-Mollusca-Cephalopoda-Sepiida-Sepiidae-Metasepia
astronomy-to-zoology:

Pfeffer’s Flamboyant Cuttlefish
(Metasepia pfefferi)
Is another species of cuttlefish that occupies the same habitat as the pyjama squid, Indo-Pacific and Australia, also it shares it’s poison glands as it is one of the few Cephalopods that are poisonous, displayed by it’s flamboyant colors. they are also quite small as well at 2.4 in. they are active during the day and are known to hunt it uses camouflage to stalk its prey. another feature of this species is due to it’s small cuttlebone it can’t float/swim for long periods of time and almost exclusivly walks upon the sea floor
Phylogeny
Animalia-Mollusca-Cephalopoda-Sepiida-Sepiidae-Metasepia

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pfeffer’s Flamboyant Cuttlefish

(Metasepia pfefferi)

Is another species of cuttlefish that occupies the same habitat as the pyjama squid, Indo-Pacific and Australia, also it shares it’s poison glands as it is one of the few Cephalopods that are poisonous, displayed by it’s flamboyant colors. they are also quite small as well at 2.4 in. they are active during the day and are known to hunt it uses camouflage to stalk its prey. another feature of this species is due to it’s small cuttlebone it can’t float/swim for long periods of time and almost exclusivly walks upon the sea floor

Phylogeny

Animalia-Mollusca-Cephalopoda-Sepiida-Sepiidae-Metasepia

(via elijahshandseight)

palaeopedia:

The small Roamer, Meiolania (1886)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Testudines
Family : Meiolaniidae
Genus : Meiolania
Species : M. brevicollis, M. damelipi, M. platyceps, M. mackayi

  • Pleistocene/Recent (2 Ma - 2 000 years)
  • 2,5 m long and 500 kg (size)
  • Lord Howe Island/Queensland, Australia (map)

Meiolania was one of the largest, and one of the most bizarre, prehistoric turtles in earth’s history: this slow-moving denizen of Pleistocene Australia not only sported a huge, hard shell, but its strangely armored head and spiked tail seem to have been borrowed from the ankylosaur dinosaurs that predated it by tens of millions of years. In turtle terms, Meiolania has proven difficult to classify, because as far as experts can tell it neither retracted its head into its shell (like one major type of turtle) nor swung it back and forth (like the other major type).

By the way, when its remains were first discovered, Meiolania was mistaken for a prehistoric species of monitor lizard. That’s why its Greek name, which means “little wanderer,” echoes Megalania, the giant monitor lizard that lived in Australia around the same time. Perhaps Meiolania evolved its impressive armor to avoid being eaten by its larger reptile cousin!

griseus:

NEW FISH SPECIES DISCOVERED IN WATERS OF NEW CALEDONIA

The small hatchetfish in the genus Polyipnus from Sternoptychidae family are micronekton, i.e. marine organisms that measure from 2 to 20 cm in length. They feed on small fish, crustaceans and molluscs and mainly live at depths of 200 to 2000 m. That is why it is extremely rare to see such specimens at the surface of the water. According to the fishers’ remarks, it seems that a school of dolphins was at the site; it is possible that as the dolphins were coming up from the deepwater, they pushed the fish to the surface.
This fish family has photophores (light-emitting organs) on their bodies, whose characteristics are important for identifying the species. Adult fish can grow to lengths of 7 cm and are part of the diet of big-eyed tuna.
Other specimens need to be recovered because with just one it is not possible to publish a description of this new species or give it a name.

Photo and Info:The Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Noumea, New Caledonia

griseus:

NEW FISH SPECIES DISCOVERED IN WATERS OF NEW CALEDONIA

The small hatchetfish in the genus Polyipnus from Sternoptychidae family are micronekton, i.e. marine organisms that measure from 2 to 20 cm in length. They feed on small fish, crustaceans and molluscs and mainly live at depths of 200 to 2000 m. That is why it is extremely rare to see such specimens at the surface of the water. According to the fishers’ remarks, it seems that a school of dolphins was at the site; it is possible that as the dolphins were coming up from the deepwater, they pushed the fish to the surface.

This fish family has photophores (light-emitting organs) on their bodies, whose characteristics are important for identifying the species. Adult fish can grow to lengths of 7 cm and are part of the diet of big-eyed tuna.

Other specimens need to be recovered because with just one it is not possible to publish a description of this new species or give it a name.

lifeunderthewaves:

Sharptail Snake Eel by Frank_Moeller The Sharptail snake eel, is native to the Western Atlantic. They feed mainly on invertebrates and can burrow tailfirst into the sand.

nationalaquarium:

Did you know? A group of jellies is commonly referred to as a “smack!”